Elderberries are more effective than vaccines at protecting you against colds and flu


This year, the American winter has seemed especially long and cold. Though spring is just around the corner, we unfortunately haven’t quite made it through the cold and flu season yet. Medical practitioners and pharma propaganda would have you believe that the best way to boost immunity and prevent the flu is to get the vaccination, but this year’s shot is proving to be just as ineffective as it does every other year.

Fortunately, there is a better way. Instead of introducing unnatural chemicals into the body in a bid to prevent viral infections, the best way to stay healthy is to work with your body by boosting your own immune system. And one of the best immune-boosting weapons in nature’s medicine cabinet is elderberry syrup.

What is elderberry?

With a medical history dating all the way back to Hippocrates, “the father of medicine,” elderberry has a deserved reputation as a potent immune booster.

Elderberry Queen explains:

Sambucus is a genus of flowering plants in the family Adoxaceae. The different species of Sambucus are commonly called elderberry or elder. The berries and flowers of the elder plant are used as medicine. …

Sambucus nigra is the full scientific name of the most common variety used for medicinal purposes. Sambucus nigra is the species on which the majority of scientific research has been conducted. It’s a deciduous tree growing up to 32 feet tall with cream-white flowers and blue-black berries.

Elderberry is commonly available from health food stores and online in syrup, tea, wine and juice form. It is also available as infusions, sprays, pills, lozenges, etc. (Related: Elderberry is an effective treatment for colds and flu.)

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The science doesn’t lie

Elderberry is a potent antiviral that is such a good immune booster that people with autoimmune diseases are actually warned not to use it because of its immune stimulating properties.

Studies have confirmed its effectiveness against both influenza A and B (a feat which the influenza shot seems to be incapable of), resistant and non-resistant staph infections, herpes simplex, and many others.

Elderberry has good, old-fashioned, published science to back it up. Natural Health 365 reported:

The science is solid. For example, an Israeli double-blind study found that patients taking elderberry at the onset of flu-like symptoms saw improvement within 48 hours, as compared to those receiving a placebo who took 6 days to begin seeing improvement.

This fits in well with a similar Norwegian study that found that patients receiving elderberry began to recover four days earlier than those who received the placebo.

During a severe flu outbreak in Israel between 1992 and 1993, health practitioners achieved a perfect cure rate by giving patients black elderberry extract as soon as they began exhibiting symptoms. The study performed in Oslo, Norway, in 2002 reported very similar findings. In both studies, patients were cured within 48 hours.

In contrast, Tamiflu – an antiviral medication – usually takes around five days to cure people with the flu, while those who take no medication will usually start getting better after about six days. (Related: Elderberry trumps Tamiflu for flu remedy.)

Elderberry also has potent antioxidant, diuretic, anti-inflammatory, cleansing and mild laxative properties. It is also loaded with vitamin C, flavonoids and fruit acids. Its ability to induce profuse sweating also makes it an invaluable aid in naturally breaking a fever.

So, if winter colds and flu are starting to get you down, don’t despair. Curl up on the couch in front of the TV with a lovely hot cup of elderberry tea and let nature take care of the problem.

Discover more of nature’s secrets at Nutrients.news.

Sources for this article include:

NaturalHealth365.com

NCBI.NLM.NIH.gov

OrganicConsumers.org

NaturalNews.com

NaturalNews.com



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